Posts Tagged ‘government’

Nickels and Dimes and Pennies; The Real Cost of a Teacher.

February 27, 2011

So I started to think about teachers as the CAUSE OF ALL ECONOMIC PROBLEMS IN THE U.S. today ( At least this is the image that is being projected today). I considered my salary and whether I was ripping off the taxpayers in California… who pay about $9,000 per student a year for each student’s education.

(Source: http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind10/c8/c8s1o11.htm). I decided to examine this question through several lenses.

Lens One

Using high-end figures for my analysis, my salary and benefits would equal $100,000. For clarity and simplicity I have used rounded numbers for this discussion. To begin with I teach 200 students a day for 180 days. When I divide $100,000 by these numbers I come to a daily cost of $2.78 per student per day. Now since I have reached the top of my district’s pay scale, most of the teachers at my site earn less than I do. But let’s err on the high side and say that on average teachers at my school cost the tax payer $2.50 per class for each student’s teacher. Students at my school have 7 classes a day so the teachers’ salaries (including all benefits) would cost the taxpayer $17.50 a day or$ 87.50 a week or $350.00 a month. I am paid 10 equal payments throughout the year which means $3,500.00 is the cost of a child’s teacher at my site for an entire year.

 Question …where is the other $5,500 spent?

Is a child’s education in my class worth a parent passing up a Starbucks…or a Big Mac…or a trip on the Metro? Is the cost of a day of education for a child worth a pair of movie tickets…or two margaritas…or having someone clean half your house?

Sidebar: Considered another way… the amount of money my district receives for 11 of my 200 students would cover the cost of my salary and benefits for a year.

Now let’s return to my data. You could say I cost each parent of each student in my class $2.78 a day. I spend 45 minutes instructing that child. This does not include the time spent planning and researching and grading any assignment your student is given. It does not include the hour and a half minimum I spend every day after school working with students who need extra help or a place to work or to access the technology or supplies they need in order to complete their homework. Also be aware that I have the same educational experience as a lawyer. I have a BA, a credential, a CLAD certificate, and a MS. That is 8 years of college level work. I have 36 years of experience. I belong to professional organizations, read current literature, and attend conferences to improve my practice.

Question…Which doctor, lawyer, accountant, or therapist would  you expect to provide 45 minutes of services at a cost of $2.78?

Lens Two

Next I considered my salary through another lens. How much does each student cost the tax payer for the hours I work?

Once again I will use the $100,000 figure for my salary and benefits and the 200 figure for my number of students. (My actual student number is 197 by the way).  If I add up the actual hours I work the average would be 10 hours a day. For the purposes of this discussion I will not include my weekend hours.

Next I did the math.

100,000/10=10,000 salary divided by months

10,000 /4= 2,500 cost per week

2,500/5=500 cost per day

500/10=50 cost per hour

50/200=.25  This is the cost to the taxpayer per student per hour for me to prepare, instruct, and evaluate  a child’s learning.

Question… How many minutes at a parking meter is that or how many minutes on a dryer at a Laundromat?

By the way if I completed this process using my 7 hour contracted day the cost comes to .33 cents per student per hour.
My Conclusion

I am a bargain for the taxpayers and for the children that I teach. As we work as a nation to improve economic conditions let’s not nickel and dime the education of our children. That would be “penny wise and pound foolish” (Burton).

Do These Results Matter? Fundamentals vs Fluency

July 11, 2009

If you haven’t had a chance to read my post “How Did You Do? Does It Matter?” you might want to do so before reading this one. The fact that only 3.5% of the students surveyed “passed” this quiz does indeed matter, but not for the reasons one might expect. Yes a good procedural understanding of how our republic works is essential to its survival. Whether it is a contested election result or a desire to address a concern to your legislator, a basic understanding of the Constitution is necessary. I sincerely believe such information is taught and tested every year in classrooms across the nation. Why then the poor performance? We as educators are reluctant to take the leap of faith into higher level thinking. Intellectually we know that low level questions such as the one on this test do not work and yet the vast majority of questions asked during a typical class are mired in recall. Often we use the rationalization that these facts are on a high stakes test. However unless we ask students to process these facts at a higher level, they are doomed to continue to fail tests like this one. It is only when students manipulate information to make meaning that gelling between the neurons occurs. It is imperative that educators take this leap into the more complex levels of higher level inquiry. Not only is it more engaging for students, it creates enduring learning.

For example how many US History teachers ask students to name the goals of the Preamble to the Constitution? This is an important concept. It is relevant to life today as we consider the proper role of government in 21st century America. However if this concept is kept as a listing item you can be assured students will not remember it. Strategic teaching recognizes this and designs tasks that allow students to manipulate essential information. Analysis, application, and evaluation will ensure recall. Engaging students in higher level activities will ensure the long term learning of the lower levels as well. Instead of asking students to list the goals have them create visuals of each goal. Then hand student groups a list of scenarios of government activities and have them analyze each scenario to identify which goal it demonstrates. Make sure some scenarios are ambiguous so groups have to come to consensus, and explain why the scenario fits the goal their group chose. Take the leap!

Key Idea: Students learn facts only when they process them at the higher levels of thinking. Drilling students at a recall level is a sure path to failure.

How would you do? Does it matter?

July 6, 2009

The following 10 citizenship questions were randomly selected from the US Citizenship test and given to 1,350 public high school students by the Goldwater Institute. Only 3.5% of those students passed by getting 6 or more of the answers correct. Look over the questions and see how well you do. Let me know how many you know. I have provided a link to a news article on the results.

In a few days I will add a comment that considers why and if these results matter. I am interested in your thoughts and questions particularly those that relate to how these results inform or hinder  a discussion about standards and enduring and essential learning.

TEST YOURSELF

1. What is the supreme law of the land?

2. What do we call the first 10 amendments to the Constitution?

3. What are the two parts of the U.S. Congress?

4. How many justices are on the Supreme Court?

5. Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?

6. What ocean is on the East Coast of the United States?

7. What are the two major political parties in the United States?

8. We elect a U.S. senator for how many years?

9. Who was the first president?

10. Who is in charge of the executive branch?

Answers and % of students who got them correct.

1. Answer: The Constitution. correct 29.5 percent

2. Answer: The Bill of Rights. correct 25 percent

3. Answer: The Senate and the House. correct 23 percent

4. Answer: Nine. correct 9.4 percent

5. Answer: Thomas Jefferson. correct 25.3 percent

6. Answer: Atlantic. correct 58.8 percent

7. Answer: Democratic and Republican. correct 49.6 percent

8. Answer: Six. correct 14.5 percent

9 Answer: Washington. correct 26.5 percent

10. Answer: The president. correct 26 percent

http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/education/299259.php