Pass on Passion

Family  Feuds

Families are often microcosms of the general population. Any family gathering I attend shares the same spectrum of political and religious views that any poll seeks to quantify. My family also has an unusually high number of educators in it ranging from classroom teachers …to professors…to consultants. So when someone who is not an educator brings up the topic of “what’s wrong with our schools” the “discussions” are always interesting and often heated by the passion of belief. Too often though the results are confirmation of everyone’s personal beliefs and a deepening of the divide that threatens to shatter our schools and our nation.  Such was the climate of a recent family gathering.

Now I am a strong advocate of following one’s passions. Such passion is the energy that fuels my 36 years in the classroom. However when that passion stops fueling positive results and is instead used to build filters so we process only those ideas that fit our own paradigm passion becomes an accelerator for destruction rather than the a fuel for growth.

The fundamentalist who shuts out or hates the person who calls God by a different name is one example. Whether that person is the Egyptian Muslim being interviewed by Christiane Amanpour or a fundamentalist Christian protesting a burial, the message is the same. I unconditionally can not hear you because your ideas do not meet my passion filter. When this happens respect vanishes and without respect no growth can occur. Stalemate or destruction are the only options available.

The same is true lately of discussions about education. So too will be the results. The casualties will be our children. As a person who believes in the power of positive passion I have been recently contemplating and reevaluating my own personal perspectives. I have considered steps I can take to ensure that I at least do not add more accelerator to the bonfire of public discussion on the state of our schools. I know that I can only change certain things, but that even a pebble can have a widening effect.

Here are some of my thoughts as of now…what are yours?

  1. There are poor and excellent schools in all systems from public to private to charter to home schools.
  2. There is room for improvement in all systems of education.
  3. There are effective and ineffective educators in all these systems.
  4. The beauty of educating everyone through high school is also our greatest challenge.
  5. Unions vs school districts …we need to lessen the vs.
  6. If we as educators want to be considered professionals, what are our responsibilities?
  7. Data is needed, but is only a piece of the puzzle.
  8. We must stop using data bites to fuel the debate on education…whether that is a case of inappropriate instruction or an improper use of a test.
  9.  Listen as Socrates would and question to learn, not to defend.
  10. Be open to acknowledging a viewpoint that differs from yours. There may be more than one road to excellence.
  11. If it doesn’t benefit the students it doesn’t belong in education.
  12. Get used to change…it is an affirmation of life.

I am not quite sure where my ruminations will end up, but I know that I do not want to have my passion for learning transformed into a fuel that will in the end destroy that about which I am passionate.

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